Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens|Book Review

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To begin with Oliver Twist is a very sad, heartbreaking and eye-opening story. I personally love the way Charles Dickens wrote. I connect with his language in a very deep way as a lot of the books I read as a child were written by English authors. I simply just love and enjoy the language of that era.

This is a very tough tale to stomach with a lot of twists and turns in the plot. It was hard for me to keep up with all the characters in the book so bear with me if my account seems jumbled.

Oliver is an orphan whose mother has died in childbirth. He lives in dreadful poverty under the care of Mrs. Mann at a baby farm, meaning Mrs. Mann received some sort of payment for housing Oliver. One day, he was plucked from the baby farm by Mr. Bumble, the parish beedle and taken to a workhouse where he was poorly treated, as he had been all of his life. Oliver is nine years old by the way. While at the workhouse, he was tricked into asking for more gruel…that’s where the famous line, “Please sir, I want some more,” came from. Well this ignited rage among the board of well-fed gentlemen, who then offers five pounds to anyone willing to take Oliver under their care.

Oliver is then sent to the Sowerberry’s. There Mr. Sowerberry treats him somewhat better than his care givers before, but Mr. Sowerberry’s wife looks down upon Oliver with passionate hate. Another incident occurs which leads to Oliver running away from the Sowerberry’s for a chance at a better life in London.

I don’t want to spoil the entire book so I’ll summarize from here that Oliver meets great misfortune as well as people who has come to genuinely care for him. And something optimistic to look forward to, he might just find out about his family.

Hope that was a good enough account of this well loved story. Do you like reading classics? Leave me a comment on which ones you’ve enjoyed and why.

Happy Reading!

xo Kat

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