The Perfect Child by Lucinda Berry|Book Review

Synopsis:

Christopher Bauer and his wife Hannah, both work at the hospital as an orthopedic surgeon and nurse respectively. One night, a small child is admitted, in bad condition nothing short of horrifying. The child, Janie, is around 6 years old, but looks more like a toddler in size. Janie suffers from multiple ailments, physical ones due to abuse, and mental ones, due to neglect. We learn that Janie’s mother was killed, and the police found Janie bound and tied up in a trailer with chains. Janie’s recuperation is a long road ahead, but the Bauers, who had formed a connection with Janie at the hospital, takes it upon themselves to foster Janie as they may be in the perfect profession to care for someone like Janie.

Genre: Thriller

My Review:

This was a horrifyingly gripping read. Each page made me impatient to get to the next, however disturbing the details grew. Told from the POVs of Christopher Bauer and Hannah Bauer(Janie’s adoptive parents) and Piper Goldstein(Janie’s case worker), enough story was given and enough story was held back to show a brilliant case of unreliable narration. The pacing was great, not too detail-y and boring, kept me invested for sure. Short and concise chapters, just the way I like it.

At times, the adoptive parents were naive and possible stupid but i can’t fault them for that. They were first time parents who took on a situation bigger than they can handle. Right off the bat, I knew that these characters and their story wouldn’t end wrapped in a pretty little bow. Again, something i like. I read elsewhere about the abrupt ending, but i honestly can’t complain about it. Some stories need to challenge readers to interpret their own understanding of what happens.

This book gave realistic insight into the repercussions of child abuse and neglect. As much as I was disgusted and heartbroken about what happened to Janie, the author also showed how truly sinister she could be.

Marry Me at Christmas by Susan Mallory

Synopsis

Madeline, co-owner of Paper Moon, a bridal shop lands a job as a wedding planner. She is to deliver the dress and plan the wedding for Ginger, the sister of Jonny Blaze, a famous action star.

Jonny Blaze, action star has bought a house in a quiet tight-knit town where the people are all smiles and warmth. He wants to plan the most amazing wedding for his younger sister Ginger.

He and Madeline work closely together, butting heads along the way to plan the perfect wedding for Ginger. As sparks begin to fly, Madeline can’t decide is she’s really falling for Jonny Blaze, the man or the star.

My review

I saw a Hallmark movie based on this book, I think. Of course, it’s a more toned down version. Despite knowing how the story progresses, I kept reading. A nice, cozy read to get into for the holidays. I think I gave it a three star rating due to it’s boring dialogue and descriptions in between. Some parts were hard to plough through. The book actually didn’t start kicking in for me until well into it.

Madeline’s character was a bit bland, basic. But it is a hallmark-type holiday romance after all. I would recommend if you’re into chick lit and love the fuzzy feeling a good love story gives you around the holidays.

Happy Reading!

xo Kat

 

I Applaud Young Readers

My title may mislead but I promise there’s an explanation. This thought just hit me by the way so I apologize in advance if I didn’t get my point across. So, I was born in the late eighties and I basically consider myself a 90s kid. Because that’s when I really got to come into my own interests, and my core learning. I often talk about how I developed a love of books very early on because I was gifted books all the time, libraries fascinated me, and reading/english was my favorite subject. That’s just me in a nutshell. I did go outside and play with my cousins, spend tons of time playing with toys on weekends and holidays as school nights were a no-no for TV and playing. But my parents were generous when it came to reading. It kept me up at night, woke up tired in the morning, I read during classes and I was never scolded because of it so I got swept up in books.

Now that you have a little back story, I have to mention that in the nineties in the Caribbean, there wasn’t a whole lot of TV, video games going on. Not that I didn’t have it, I did but it was monitored, much like parents nowadays will monitor their children’s device usage. But we didn’t have social media and the pressures that come with being relevant on social media. Of course, it was on a smaller scale within the classroom. But when we went home, we went home.

Reading was a an important form of entertainment in past generations as there weren’t much else to do. Think about times before TV and Video Games. Think beyond that. But there was reading.

I must say it makes me feel fuzzy inside when I see young people taken up with reading. To us bookish people, it may sound like a common thing to see but I can assure you most people I know won’t even read one book in a year. So it’s really awesome to see young readers invested in this form of escape, entertainment. Don’t you agree?

Happy Reading!

xo Kat

Captive Rebel by Erin McDermott|Book Review

Book title: Captive Rebel (The allegiance book 1)

Author: Erin McDermott

Rating:⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Synopsis: Destined to be enemies, bound by fate…

Prince Ariston rules over the Allegiant – an elite faction favored by the Greek Gods. Separated from his family at a young age, he became a prisoner to the rebellion.

Marylyn O’Conner is a rebel, forced to do the rebellion’s bidding until an unforgiving family debt is paid. A pawn in the war for rebels to gain their freedom, she is obligated to become a spy, or her family will suffer.

Driven by revenge after returning from captivity, Prince Ariston makes it his mission to hunt down rebel spies, capturing Marylyn O’Conner in the process.

Desperate, Marylyn knows she needs to escape her alluring captor, or risk the safety of her family.

My Review: For some unknown reason this book reminded me of Cinder(the Lunar Chronicles). The story is by no chance similar but my feelings towards both books were. Why? Because the characters were likeable, straightforward. There was no clutter in this book which I appreciated as a reader, and writer. Everything flowed, no loop holes, no mindless yammering. A romance, but not only a romance. And it ended well yet left avenues open for the sequels. Overall, I would recommend if you like YA Dystopian or Fantasy, Action & Adventure.

Happy reading!

Xo Kat

Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews|Book Review

811d3zAinkL

Flowers in the Attic is the first installment of The Dollanganger Series, followed by three books and one prequel. I’ve read all except the prequel which I plan to read and review some time.

Does anyone read V.C. Andrews? Sometimes I feel like I’m the only one hehe. I enjoy VC’s books quite a lot. Like I’ve said before, I don’t stick to one particular genre and I hardly read YA so my blog might sound a bit foreign.

If you’ve heard of the movie that came out on Lifetime a couple of years ago, then you’ll know about the taboo subjects explored in Flowers in the Attic as well as throughout the entire series.

Book one follows Corinne and her four children, who has just lost their father in an accident, leaving them in debt. Corinne shows up to her mother’s house with her two teenagers and younger twins, Cathy and Chris and Cory and Carrie respectively. Corinne hasn’t seen her mother in years due to a fallout in which it’s hinted at this time that it was something bad that Corinne did.

Soon after arriving at their grandmother, Olivia’s house, the book centers on the lives of the children who are treated with disdain and scorn. The children don’t quite understand the dynamics of their history yet and are in for a rude awakening when their grandmother locks them in the attic, blocking them off from society, and life.

Corinne rarely visits her children who are abused by their grandmother. They begin to mistrust their neglectful mother as she appears to care more about her wealthy inheritance than her own flesh and blood. Cathy and Chris transforms the attic into a place where their younger siblings can experience life between four walls. They read books and try to teach Cory and Carrie as well as make pretty paper flowers. I’m guessing that’s where the title plays in.

Olivia puts the notion of a romantic relationship in Cathy and Chris’ heads until both siblings’ romantic realizations are for each other. This was the first book I’ve ever read with any sort of incestual relations, but I quite liked the story.

What you’ll want to know before reading this book is, will they ever get out? How will the twins survive the ordeal being so young? And what’s next for Cathy and Chris in terms of their taboo feelings for one another?

Happy Reading!

To find out more what happens to the children and their mother, check out the rest in the series: Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, Garden of Shadows(Prequel-Corinne’s Story)

Leave me a comment if you’ve read this one. Did you like it or not?

xo Kat

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens|Book Review

MAFE-00643

To begin with Oliver Twist is a very sad, heartbreaking and eye-opening story. I personally love the way Charles Dickens wrote. I connect with his language in a very deep way as a lot of the books I read as a child were written by English authors. I simply just love and enjoy the language of that era.

This is a very tough tale to stomach with a lot of twists and turns in the plot. It was hard for me to keep up with all the characters in the book so bear with me if my account seems jumbled.

Oliver is an orphan whose mother has died in childbirth. He lives in dreadful poverty under the care of Mrs. Mann at a baby farm, meaning Mrs. Mann received some sort of payment for housing Oliver. One day, he was plucked from the baby farm by Mr. Bumble, the parish beedle and taken to a workhouse where he was poorly treated, as he had been all of his life. Oliver is nine years old by the way. While at the workhouse, he was tricked into asking for more gruel…that’s where the famous line, “Please sir, I want some more,” came from. Well this ignited rage among the board of well-fed gentlemen, who then offers five pounds to anyone willing to take Oliver under their care.

Oliver is then sent to the Sowerberry’s. There Mr. Sowerberry treats him somewhat better than his care givers before, but Mr. Sowerberry’s wife looks down upon Oliver with passionate hate. Another incident occurs which leads to Oliver running away from the Sowerberry’s for a chance at a better life in London.

I don’t want to spoil the entire book so I’ll summarize from here that Oliver meets great misfortune as well as people who has come to genuinely care for him. And something optimistic to look forward to, he might just find out about his family.

Hope that was a good enough account of this well loved story. Do you like reading classics? Leave me a comment on which ones you’ve enjoyed and why.

Happy Reading!

xo Kat